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The “N”-Word|In 2008

To the bewildered:
To begin, let me first say that I disagree with the word myself. However,  you probably don’t  realize that the word’s meaning, for black people who do use it, is completely different from the meaning someone white may think. Most whites look at it as a disrespectful term because of the historical aspect of it, and for that reason I and other blacks think so too. The historical aspect is to degrade and belittle black people.To black people who use the word, it means, almost as if to say, “You’re one of us” but without the negative connotations that are tied to it historically. 

When Whoopie Goldberg, from The View, made the comment about “owning” the word, this is how black people feel who use the word. They feel because they have been degraded with the word down through the years, they would take it for themselves, in turn, and use it to their own advantage, as oppose to their disadvantage. I believe this came from the hurt, shame, and pain of it all.

With that being said, what reason would a white person have to say it and what would their meaning be for those who think a double standard exist? Most certainly, it would not be for the same reason I just stated above—and that is what makes it offensive coming from them. To make this simpler…think of it as reverse psychology because it is very similar. I just wanted to say that for clarification as to the differences in how some blacks view the word and how whites view it.

To my fellow black readers, and still the confused- As for my personal take on this:

My rejection of this word has absolutely nothing to do with me wanting not to sound “black” and has everything to do with respect for my ancestors, people, and myself. Unfortunately, there are so many African Americans (old and young) who use this word for each other, and either way one looks at it, it’s still negative even when said by us—truth be told, a lot of us don’t see it this way. I am not sure if this is out of habit or upbringing but it’s disgraceful all together.

When my great grandmother and granddaddy were addressed as, subjected to, whipped and killed in the names of “coon” “colored” “nigger” day in and day out— there’s absolutely nothing to take from that word, and just because one takes off the “er” and gives it an “a” at then end, makes no difference. It’s like calling a stone a rock—it’s more or less the same thing…..coming from an insider.

Check out: http://www.abolishthenword.com/

I am compelled to say, however, that most people were shocked at hearing Whoopi’s comments concerning black and whites living in different worlds. I’m sorry to break this to anyone living in “Dream Land“, but she is right.

 We have yet to reach equality for all; discrimination is still at large.

The double standard that Elizabeth talked about on The View is more in the “democracy” of America than anywhere else. There are double standards in education, there are double standards in housing opportunities for blacks, double standards exist in the media, there are double standards even with buying cars in America—- compare that to the black and white world. Want proof?

http://www.cdc.gov/omhd/Highlights/2007/HFeb07.htm

http://faculty.winthrop.edu/stonebrakerr/book/automobiles.htm

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11 Comments»

  ironsuit wrote @

awesome blog! I hate hearing the “n” word in conversation or music. It sounds to me like profanity and lazyness for not learning more accurate words. Around whites it sounds racist, and around blacks it sounds getto and both accomplishes nothing. I can forgive it, though, in a joking mater or when kids are just talking silly. Usually they are just copying rappers and t.v. shows. again. nice blog 🙂 you got me thinking on a subject i usually avoid.

  Gabrieloneverything wrote @

The negative connotation for the word still exists today. One might see some old light skinned person talking about some teenagers who happen to be causing a scene and they would call them or think to themselves that they were “niggers”. When some Black people act rowdy and ruin something for a majority of Blacks, those select few are called “niggaz”.

Also…changing the spelling/pronouciation of the word doesn’t take away any level of offense. My view is that if you’re going to use it, then use it, but don’t think just because you say it ‘nigguh’ instead of ‘nigguuur’ that it is any less offensive. But these are just my humble ramblings.

  indigoblu wrote @

Gabriel:

I take it you did not finish reading the blog:

When my great grandmother and granddaddy were addressed as, subjected to, whipped and killed in the names of “coon” “colored” “nigger” day in and day out— there’s absolutely nothing to take from that word, and just because one takes off the “er” and gives it an “a” at then end, makes no difference. It’s like calling a stone a rock—it’s more or less the same thing…..coming from an insider.

As for the word still having negative connotations when blacks use it, although they may be referred to as such, in a group, or in causing a scene….it is equally, if not more, used in a positive way, and by no means…is it in the same negative light that a slave owner may have used it….in mere hate.

  indigoblu wrote @

ironsuit:

Thanks for dropping by and saying the nice things you had to say about my blog; I agree it is more or less profanity to my ears as well.

  gabrieloneverything wrote @

My fault. The page down button was too powerful lol.

And I’m not saying that it is still in the same negative light as the slave owner. There is nothing that a Black person can do to another Black person that has the same negativity to it (not even Bob Johnson or Michael Jordon) that a slave owner did to our ancestors back in the day. I agree with you. However there is still negativity behind the word. You can bury some crap and the bottom of a cake, but the crap doesn’t go away, no matter how good you think the cake tastes. Whereas with the slave owner there was no cake…not even a 0.25 cake…

  annettsbn wrote @

The N word does not have the same definition for Blacks then it is to hear a white person say it. If you ever hear the tone and the pitch the voice when a white person says nigger, it takes you back to the slave trade to the plantation, the many beatings and separation of our family, this may seem dramatic, it is. That’s what they called us to not only put us down but keep us there. The N word is something we took and changed and you can’t have it. I was very amazed at the anchor (sorry can’t remember her name) to get so emotional over the fact that she doesn’t understand why. Well ask her, if we all live here together and we are all equal, then why hasn’t the right for blacks to vote ever been made into law, the very fact that it has to be amended every ten years shows even now, how we don’t all live equally together. Tell her to shed tear over that. Or the fact the the inner kids don’t get the same education as those in the suburb, or medical car or jobs opportunities. She will be crying for a long time. We don’t have as much, but, what is our is our and you can’t have it. Don’t get me wrong, we have come a long way and well continue. But don’t shed behind something you don’t want to understand.

  indigoblu wrote @

annettsbn:

The N word does not have the same definition for Blacks then it is to hear a white person say it. If you ever hear the tone and the pitch the voice when a white person says nigger, it takes you back to the slave trade to the plantation, the many beatings and separation of our family, this may seem dramatic, it is. That’s what they called us to not only put us down but keep us there. The N word is something we took and changed and you can’t have it. I was very amazed at the anchor (sorry can’t remember her name) to get so emotional over the fact that she doesn’t understand why.

So we agree that they are viewed two different ways, but I still disagree with using the word amongst ourselves; everything about it reeks negativity to me.

The N word is something we took and changed and you can’t have it.

I am not sure if you think I am not AAor what…I can’t tell judging by some of the things you said. Anyway, I am AA.

Well ask her, if we all live here together and we are all equal, then why hasn’t the right for blacks to vote ever been made into law, the very fact that it has to be amended every ten years shows even now, how we don’t all live equally together. Tell her to shed tear over that.

You are right, and I thought about that too when I saw Elizabeth crying…she just doesn’t have a clue. The system is so screwed up, particularly in reference to black people.

Thanks for your comments.

  ironsuit wrote @

anettsbn
The 15th amendment gave blacks the right vote and latley blacks have been voting in more numbers than ever. If you didnt know this, please, register to vote. Its true the education system isnt very fair though.

I have been living in rural texas for 2 years now and some of the school down here get far less money and support. It just so happens that they are school full of imigrant hispanic kids. but, the fact is, as of now, the state has the legal right to allow communities to be taxed to pay for their own schools.

When you live in a poor community, with less property value the schools dont get the money they need to do there job.

I agree with you that blacks, generally, arnt treated as equals. But the trueth is no one is treated as equals. Immigrants, muslims, terrorist, working class and poor some examples.

I respect the fact that you are passionate about you culture, it makes you strong. Often, I wish that I had more culture.

  indigoblu wrote @

ironsuit:

Although it is true that African Americans have the right to vote and are, like you said, especially this year voting in large numbers, I believe anettsbn was referring to the fact that the Voting Rights act of 1965 that gives African Americans—and every American for that matter– the right to vote, basically without discrimination but it’s mostly for African Americans and other minorities, has some aspects of it that have to be renewed in order to stay into effect.

It is said the Act is there so that mostly Southern states, who were known to discriminate against African Americans when voting, would have to get federal approval before they change any aspect of their voting laws in Section 5.

For example, they use to have a jar filled with candy, marbles, paper clips or such…and when an African American would come and attempt to register to vote, or just to vote at all, the white lady or men behind the counter would kindly tell them that before they could do either, they’d have to guess exactly how many marbles, pieces of candy, or paperclips was in the huge jar–and of course the white guy/lady didn’t know themselves, they were just acting their element.

As crazy as that sounds, it happened, and of course, even if they guessed correctly by some stroke of luck, the person behind the counter would tell them–“No, your guess was wrong, sorry—you can not vote/register to vote.”

This was only done to African Americans of course, not whites.

Anyway, provisions like that should be nonexistent now—it only promotes the idea that African Americans are somehow 2nd class citizens and will always be treated as such —we are regular citizens like everyone else, and should be included as such in the 15th amendment alone, not with an assistant. Act. There was a place for it then, but I think it is time to let it go, or just include it into the 15th amendment all together. Morever, they should just make people adhere to the 15th amendment because it, alone, gives the right to vote without discrimination no matter what your race.

For More Info See: http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/voting/misc/faq.htm#faq16

  ironsuit wrote @

yea i agree. I heard of literacy test, voting charges and all to keep black people from voting. Until the voting rights act of’64. Sucks.

  beth wrote @

Like I always say to people who use the “n” word, because I see it as a very bad negative also. I say that there are “n’s” in every race! So we should not belittle evryone. There’s so much negative out there any way, that we should strive to look for and find the Good! !!
No good has ever come from name calling any way. Love you Woopie, your a wonderful person. I would love to meet you some day. I am native american, Chalktaw and cherokee. I have a little german and irish too.


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